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Living Arts Originals features a wide variety of articles on all types of symbols and their meanings. The types of symbols that Living Arts Originals focuses on include flowers, animals, colors, nature, color, sacred, and many more.

Christmas Symbols -
Insights About Popular Christmas Symbols

By Bernadette Dimitrov
√ Updated: September 14, 2010

We all love Christmas symbols used as decorations however most people have no idea where they originally came from. It certainly adds to a deeper enjoyment of Christmas when meaning is added. Imagine the delightful Christmas conversations sharing your new insights. So read on and enjoy a deeper understanding of three popular symbols and their meaning!

christmas bellsChristmas Bells - Bells were traditionally rung to celebrate the birth of Christ on Christmas morning. In olden times bells were assumed to chase away evil spirits. They believed that noise of any kind would repel evil. Bells represent the death of the devil (ignorance) and the birth of goodness (enlightenment). In modern times Father Christmas uses jingling bells accompanying his sleigh progress to announce the birth of goodness and new beginnings and ultimately to remind us to seek enlightenment that is, to develop the good within us all!

christmas candyCandy Cane - A 17th century craftsman created white sticks of candy in the shape of shepherd's crooks at the suggestion of a Choirmaster in Germany. The treats were passed out to children to keep them quiet during ceremonies at the nativity scene. It didn't take long for the word to spread and a new custom to be created. In the 1950's a USA Catholic Priest, Gregory Keller, invented a machine to make the candy and thus growing its popularity even more throughout the world. They were made white with red stripes. Red symbolizing new life and white for Christ's purity. Later green was added as a symbol of everlasting life and the three strips represented the Holy Trinity (the three Gods ie. the Father, the Son (Jesus Christ) and the Holy Spirit).

Christmas Stockings - This is the most famous stocking legend. It rekindles the virtues of giving without expectation for which St Nicholas was legendary! The story says a kindly nobleman's wife had died, and overcome by grief the nobleman became self destructive, so much so that he foolishly squandered his entire fortune leaving his 3 young daughters doweryless and facing a life of hardship and spinsterhood. The generous St Nicholas heard of the plight of the young girls and decided to help them yet remain anonymous. In the dark of the night he rode his white horse by the house and threw three small pouches of gold coins down the chimney where they were fortuitously captured by the stockings the young women had hung by the fireplace to dry. Word spread fast and the hanging of stockings on Christmas night became hugely popular in the hope of a surprise!

As you can see symbols have a beautiful history and fun legends attached to them. Introduce the meanings into your conversations with family and friends this festive season and explore the delights of the meanings of symbols.

Visit http://www.HoHoHoChristmas.com & sign up for our FREE Newsletter full of tips, tools & resources for reviving the fun, joy, magic and real meanings of Christmas PLUS receive our bonus f*r*e*e 10 day e-course with audio - Amazing Ways to Enrich Your Christmas Experience from The HoHoHo Expert, Bernadette Dimitrov, author of the world's best Christmas ebooks and audio books. The HoHoHo Factor!’ everything you’ll love to know & share about Christmas & the new fun adventure series ‘Bluey, Santa's New Recruit!’ Your resources for creating fun and cherished memories today!

Article Source: Christmas Symbols - 3 Amazing Insights About 3 Popular Christmas Symbols!

Find beautiful Christmas Flowers and Gifts.


More About Christmas Symbols

Learn more about Christmas symbols in these recommended books from Amazon:
Holly, Reindeer, and Colored Lights: The Story of the Christmas Symbols
Christmas: Celebrating the Christian History of American Symbols, Songs and Stories
Do You Know What I Know?: The Symbols of Christmas
Christmas Trees (Holiday Symbols)


christmas treeTraditions: Christmas Trees and Ornaments

The fir tree has a long association with Christianity, it began in Germany almost 1,000 years ago when St Boniface, who converted the German people to Christianity, was said to have come across a group of pagans worshipping an oak tree. In anger, St Boniface is said to have cut down the oak tree and to his amazement a young fir tree sprung up from the roots of the oak tree. St Boniface took this as a sign of the Christian faith. But it was not until the 16th century that fir trees were brought indoors at Christmas time.

CHRISTMAS TREE TRADITION HAS ANCIENT ORIGINS

King Tut never saw a Christmas tree, but he would have understood the tradition which traces back long before the first Christmas, says David Robson, Extension Educator, Horticulture with the Springfield Extension Center.

The Egyptians were part of a long line of cultures that treasured and worshipped evergreens. When the winter solstice arrive, they brought green date palm leaves into their homes to symbolize life's triumph over death.

The Romans celebrated the winter solstice with a fest called Saturnalia in honor of Saturnus, the god of agriculture. They decorated their houses with greens and lights and exchanged gifts. They gave coins for prosperity, pastries for happiness, and lamps to light one's journey through life.

Centuries ago in Great Britain, woods priests called Druids used evergreens during mysterious winter solstice rituals. The Druids used holly and mistletoe as symbols of eternal life, and place evergreen branches over doors to keep away evil spirits.

Late in the Middle Ages, Germans and Scandinavians placed evergreen trees inside their homes or just outside their doors to show their hope in the forthcoming spring. Our modern Christmas tree evolved from these early traditions.

Legend has it that Martin Luther began the tradition of decorating trees to celebrate Christmas. One crisp Christmas Eve, about the year 1500, he was walking through snow-covered woods and was struck by the beauty of a group of small evergreens. Their branches, dusted with snow, shimmered in the moonlight. When he got home, he set up a little fir tree indoors so he could share this story with his children. He decorated it with candles, which he lighted in honor of Christ's birth.

The Christmas tree tradition most likely came to the United States with Hessian troops during the American Revolution, or with German immigrants to Pennsylvania and Ohio, adds Robson.

But the custom spread slowly. The Puritans banned Christmas in New England. Even as late as 1851, a Cleveland minister nearly lost his job because he allowed a tree in his church. Schools in Boston stayed open on Christmas Day through 1870, and sometimes expelled students who stayed home.

The Christmas tree market was born in 1851 when Catskill farmer Mark Carr hauled two ox sleds of evergreens into New York City and sold them all. By 1900, one in five American families had a Christmas tree, and 20 years later, the custom was nearly universal.

Christmas tree farms sprang up during the depression. Nurserymen couldn't sell their evergreens for landscaping, so they cut them for Christmas trees. Cultivated trees were preferred because they have a more symmetrical shape then wild ones.

Six species account for about 90 percent of the nation's Christmas tree trade. Scotch pine ranks first, comprising about 40 percent of the market, followed by Douglas fir which accounts for about 35 percent. The other big sellers are noble fir, white pine, balsam fir and white spruce.

Permission was granted for Internet use by --- Written by: David Robson, Extension Educator, Horticulture; Springfield Extension Center

Find beautiful Christmas Flowers and Gifts.

More About Christmas Symbols

Learn more about Christmas symbols in these recommended books from Amazon:
Holly, Reindeer, and Colored Lights: The Story of the Christmas Symbols
Christmas: Celebrating the Christian History of American Symbols, Songs and Stories
Do You Know What I Know?: The Symbols of Christmas
Christmas Trees (Holiday Symbols)



CHRISTMAS TREE HISTORY

Did a celebration around a Christmas tree on a bitter cold Christmas Eve at Trenton, New Jersey, turn the tide for Colonial forces in 1776? According to legend, Hessian mercenaries were so reminded of home by a candlelit evergreen tree that they abandoned their guardposts to eat, drink and be merry. Washington attacked that night and defeated them.

The Christmas tree has gone through a long process of development rich in many legends, says David Robson, Extension Educator, Horticulture, with the Springfield Extension Center.

Some historians trace the lighted Christmas tree to Martin Luther. He attached lighted candles to a small evergreen tree, trying to simulate the reflections of the starlit heaven -- the heaven that looked down over Bethlehem on the first Christmas Eve.

Until about 1700, the use of Christmas trees appears to have been confined to the Rhine River District. From 1700 on, when lights were accepted as part of the decorations, the Christmas tree was well on its way to becoming a tradition in Germany. Then the tradition crossed the Atlantic with the Hessian soldiers.

Some people trace the origin of the Christmas tree to an earlier period. Even before the Christian era, trees and boughs were used for ceremonials. Egyptians, in celebrating the winter solstice -- the shortest day of the year -- brought green date palms into their homes as a symbol of "life triumphant over death". When the Romans observed the feast of saturn, part of the ceremony was the raising of an evergreen bough. The early Scandinavians were said to have paid homage to the fir tree.

To the Druids, sprigs of evergreen holly in the house meant eternal life; while to the Norsemen, they symbolized the revival of the sun god Balder. To those inclined toward superstition, branches of evergreens placed over the door kept out witches, ghosts, evil spirits and the like.

This use does not mean that our Christmas tree custom evolved solely from paganism, any more than did some of the present-day use of sighed in various religious rituals.

Trees and branches can be made purposeful as well as symbolic. The Christmas tree is a symbol of a living Christmas spirit and brings into our lives a pleasant aroma of the forest. The fact that balsam fir twigs, more than any other evergreen twigs, resemble crosses may have had much to do with the early popularity of balsam fir used as Christmas trees.

Written by: David Robson Extension Educator, Horticulture Springfield Extension Center

Find beautiful Christmas Flowers and Gifts.

More About Christmas Symbols

Learn more about Christmas symbols in these recommended books from Amazon:
Holly, Reindeer, and Colored Lights: The Story of the Christmas Symbols
Christmas: Celebrating the Christian History of American Symbols, Songs and Stories
Do You Know What I Know?: The Symbols of Christmas
Christmas Trees (Holiday Symbols

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